Motherhood Through IVF and Donorship – You Only Need One Good Egg

If I were to answer the question, “What does it really mean to be a mom?” I would say that a mom cares about her children. She is loving, kind, compassionate, strict, fair, and ready to lend an ear and a heart when it’s needed. I know for a fact that motherhood is more than biological. For me, no matter what motherhood looked like, I was determined to become a mother…

You Only Need One Good Egg, by Shelley Vidal

Motherhood is not easily accessible by everyone. But in today’s world there are options even for those desiring to be a solo parent. This is being done through IVF and donorship. Community Activist and long time friend of mine, Shelley Vidal takes us through her journey of choosing this solution to motherhood at the age of 41.

An old photo of my cousin Chinyere, me (Chanelle) and Shelley.

From the first day I met Shelley she shined attributes of a mother and I believe this blessing was well deserved. She is now the mother of a healthy and beautiful 15 month old girl. Her new book You Only Need One Good Egg is available on Amazon for purchase. It’s a wonderful guide for those seeking the same journey and for those curious about the process moms like Shelley go through.

Here is an excerpt from You Only Need One Good Egg by Shelley Vidal:

Prologue – Egg Count

In the middle of December 2018, I was in the final 6 months of my master’s degree, I had been separated from my ex-husband for nearly a year, and I was rapidly approaching 40. While at a routine doctor’s visit, I casually asked my family doctor if there was a way to find out what my chances of getting pregnant were. She mentioned that I could take a blood test that looks at certain hormone levels to determine my egg reserve and that the test was only $70.

With this new information, I eagerly said that I wanted to take the test, so she wrote up the lab requisition for me. I did the blood test within a week, but my fear of hearing the results kept me from seeing my doctor to go over the results. When I finally went to see my family doctor in April, she reviewed my Luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) results. She began explaining the results in a very scientific way and then told me I had a “very low probability of getting pregnant on my own.”

I remember calmly sitting in the office as I tried to comprehend what she had just told me. Looking back, I think I was in a state of shock, so I didn’t fully grasp what she said. Eventually, I asked her what this meant for me. I recall her telling me that she would refer me to a fertility clinic so that I could learn about my options. While numb from the news, I left the doctor’s office and I got into my car to go home.

After a block, my mind began to race and then I started to think about the possibility of not having kids. My throat tightened up and tears began to build before they slowly rolled down my cheeks. Then I started full-out boo-hooing. I was having the ugly cry, so I had to pull over. As much as I tried to pull myself together, I was too devastated, sad, disappointed, angry, frustrated, and scared. I just couldn’t stop crying.

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Flashes of failed relationships and the lost opportunities of becoming a mother flooded my mind. I called a good friend, Hannah, and through my sobs, I explained what the doctor had told me. She shared beautiful words of encouragement and reassurance. Her kindness and caring words gave me the hope that I needed to just breathe and ultimately pull myself together so that I could drive home…

Chapter One – Taking the Leap – Parenting by Courage

Choosing to be a mom means something different to every mother. As someone who is an educator by profession and passion, I often think of my students as my children (no matter their age). I truly care about their well-being and their success. I enjoy encouraging them and empowering them in their career journeys.

If I were to answer the question, “What does it really mean to be a mom?” I would say that a mom cares about her children. She is loving, kind, compassionate, strict, fair, and ready to lend an ear and a heart when it’s needed. I know for a fact that motherhood is more than biological. For me, no matter what motherhood looked like, I was determined to become a mother…

To read more order your copy through the following link: https://bit.ly/3iuznVL

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